Surrender of Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, Teaching Resources for the End of the Indian Wars



A look back at this week in history:  On January 8, 1877, six months after the Battle of Little Big Horn, Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull lost their battle against the U.S. Cavalry in Montana. enough for the women and children to escape under cover of the blinding blizzard before they turned to follow them.  Their final battle was lost.

Teachers searching for materials about American Indians will find primary sources among the Library of Congress’ vast holdings, particularly in the Edward S. Curtis collection http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/ecur/ and the John C.H. Grabill collection  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/grabill/
within the Prints and Photographs division.

Holdings, complete with relevant documents and visuals, cover periods from early contact between Europeans and native people in http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/timeline/colonial/indians/indians.html to contemporary reports of extermination of American bison: http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/timeline/riseind/west/bison.html to the maps of the American Indian and Oklahoma territories: http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/timeline/riseind/west/oklahoma.html

For those who enjoy a connection with common culture, the HBO series Deadwood in this case, you can see the last Deadwood coach (below) in the Grabill collection.

http://cdn.loc.gov/service/pnp/ppmsc/02600/02601v.jpg

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/grabill/item/99613883/

Photographers Grabill and Curtis captured the vanishing culture of the Plains Indians in the late 19th century to the immense benefit of those seeking a greater understanding today.